“Don’t Overthink It” or maybe it was the Campari

I struggle with decision-makingDon't Overthink It... a writer's desk

I over-think, over-analyze, and second-guess everything — small and large. I know I’m not alone. However, I would gladly separate myself from the rest of the over-thinking pack if only I knew how.

Don’t Overthink It by Anne Bogel

A new book title caught my eye, Don’t Overthink It by Anne Bogel. I was curious to know more and immediately downloaded a sample from Amazon. I purchased the Kindle format and read the 224-pages in one sitting. I saw something of myself in every chapter. I realized then and there how much precious time I waste on overthinking, over-analyzing, and second-guessing everything, and I mean everything, big and small. It’s a chronic state of being Anne Bogel calls “analysis paralysis”– trying to be perfect and afraid not to be. And I hate it.

When I finished reading the book, I reviewed the to-do list from four months ago of decisions I needed to make, now that I’m a new widow and on my own. I made myself pick one decision — one that I could make on a Saturday afternoon without help from an outside source. The decision: reorganize one closet with Bill’s clothes and stay with it until finished. I fixed a Campari over ice with bitters and took action.

Maybe it was Anne Bogel’s book, maybe it was the Campari

A few hours later, when I was finished sorting out the contents of one closet, what was going to be a long and solitary weekend turned out to be an uplifting and productive one. Perhaps I made a mistake or two and my closet sorting wasn’t total perfection, but at least I made some decisions and accomplished something. I went from analysis paralysis to taking action. It felt good. And I’m not going to second-guess the choices I made — I think.

If any of what I’ve written strikes a chord with you, do check out Don’t Overthink It.

Best from Casa McGee,
Sandra

8 thoughts on ““Don’t Overthink It” or maybe it was the Campari

  1. I appreciate the advice and also hearing from you. As far as the adult bevy, David would make me a Campari and sweet vermouth with a twist of lime. Delicious. Just might have one now and toast you and our dearly departed husbands.

  2. Sandra, I can relate to the “analysis paralysis” and second-guessing! We perfectionists sure know how to torture ourselves. You sold me. The book is on my must read list.

  3. Valuable insight, no question. I certainly can apply this to my life right now! Thank you. I will check out the book which inspired you to take on that very difficult task. Got ‘er done, yeehaa!

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